Civil Rights and the American Dream: Give Voice to the Landmark Harada Case

Harada House is the story of one Japanese American Family, pursuit of the Am. Dream, and how that dream varies vastly family to family, culture to culture.
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Sarah Suverkrup Mundy
Education
Riverside, California
United States
2 Team Members
This campaign is raising funds on behalf of Riverside Museum Associates, a verified nonprofit. The campaign does not necessarily reflect the views of the nonprofit or have any formal association with it. All contributions are considered unrestricted gifts and can't be specified for any particular purpose.

Why the Big Deal over Harada House?

It is the only National Historic Landmark that chronicles the extraordinary story of an average Japanese American family, in one house, spanning the 20th century, and the story needs to be told!  When the Harada family arrived in California in 1905, they were among a myriad of Pan-Asian immigrants seeking the American Dream.  However, endemic racism evidenced by the federal Chinese Exclusion Acts and the 1913 California Alien Land Law significantly impacted their ability to realize this innate immigrant desire: home ownership. Jukichi Harada successfully challenged the Alien Land Law when he purchased his Lemon Street home in in the names of his American born children. Thirty short years later, the family was faced with internment by their own country. Unlike most, the Harada family kept their house and returned to it after the war. Now a National Historic Landmark, this house not only tells the story of the Harada family, but of California, its people, and immigrants who overcame economic impediments and racial prejudices, lost civil rights and liberties, to realize the American Dream. It is unique in that it is the only National Historic Landmark site with an undisturbed house and a continuum of collections spanning the twentieth century. Its story resonates differently with every person and it is a story that needs to be told to ensure that these pivotal lessons of history continue to be accessible for all peoples. A property of the Riverside Metropolitan Museum, the house is fragile and in need of significant repair. Its location is appropriate for the story's context, but because it is in a residential neighborhood, presentation and access are major challenges. What is needed is an interpretation center. We want to buy the house next door if we can raise the funds. The house next door, referred to as the Robinson House, is an integral part of the story. With this purchase an interpretive center will be born. The funds must be raised by January 15, 2014 to secure the purchase.

We need to raise a minimum of $200,000 to buy the property and make it habitable. By participating in this important fundraising effort, you will assure this site to be a destination for the public to learn the story of the Harada Family and the significance to issues of immigration, social justice, and the pursuit of the American Dream.



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$2,560USD
raised in 1 month
1% funded
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Verified Nonprofit
$200,000 USD goal
Flexible Funding This campaign has ended and will receive all funds raised.
Campaign Closed
This campaign ended on January 10, 2014
Select a Perk
  • $100USD
    Friends Circle

    All those that give toward the Friends Circle will receive a print of the Harada House.

    7 out of 200 claimed
  • $5,000USD
    Donor

    You will be recognized on the donor wall of the Interpretive Center and will receive a print of the Harada House.

    0 out of 40 claimed
  • $10,000USD
    Founder

    To have a lasting legacy, a Founding member will donate a minimum of $10,000 and will be recognized on a plaque and will receive a print of the Harada House.

    0 out of 20 claimed
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